Battersea Bridge safety improvements scheme

Consultation has concluded

Following a number of collisions, including the tragic death of a man crossing the northern junction of Battersea Bridge in early-2021, we developed urgent plans to make this busy junction safer, which we called Phase 1 of the scheme.

In Phase 1 (2021) we built a brand-new green-man pedestrian crossing on the north side of Battersea Bridge to improve safety for people walking at this junction. We also widened the pavement on each side of Battersea Bridge Road, installed tactile paving to make it easier for people with accessibility needs, installed a new advanced stop line for cyclists and lowered

Following a number of collisions, including the tragic death of a man crossing the northern junction of Battersea Bridge in early-2021, we developed urgent plans to make this busy junction safer, which we called Phase 1 of the scheme.

In Phase 1 (2021) we built a brand-new green-man pedestrian crossing on the north side of Battersea Bridge to improve safety for people walking at this junction. We also widened the pavement on each side of Battersea Bridge Road, installed tactile paving to make it easier for people with accessibility needs, installed a new advanced stop line for cyclists and lowered the speed limit on Chelsea Embankment and across Battersea Bridge from 30mph to 20mph. These works were completed in November 2021.

Following these works and after listening to local people about their views on the local area, we then ran an engagement exercise to talk about further safety improvements in the area just north of Battersea Bridge at the junction of Battersea Bridge and Cheyne Walk in July 2022.

Over 300 people responded to our survey asking about how they currently cross the junction and the responses showed a significant level of support for further changes to ensure walking and cycling are made safer in the area.

Following this local engagement, we are now consulting on proposals to make further safety improvements to the rest of the junction. In Phase 2 we plan to introduce green-man crossings on all remaining arms of the junction. We also plan to ban the left turn into Beaufort Street.

As part of this scheme, we also plan to make changes to the southern end of Battersea Bridge to further improve safety for people walking and cycling and maintain journey times for buses.

At the northern end of the bridge, we propose to:

  • Introduce new straight-across push button pedestrian crossings on Cheyne Walk, Chelsea Embankment and Beaufort Street
  • Ban the left turn into Beaufort Street to motor traffic and cyclists to reduce delays and wait times at the turning point, improve safety and eliminate the risk of left turning vehicles colliding with cyclists. We also so plan to provide dropped kerbs and a shared use area on the northwest corner for cyclists
  • Make improvements for cyclists at the junction including dedicated cycle signals and a section of segregated cycle track
  • Build a new section of westbound bus lane from Royal Hospital Road to the bus stop at Beaufort Street to mitigate delays to bus journeys. A new eastbound bus lane is also proposed from the junction of Beaufort Street to the stop just west of the junction with Old Church Street. The bus lane will operate 24 hours a day, with taxis, motorcycles and cyclists permitted to use it

At the southern side of Battersea Bridge in Wandsworth, we are proposing to:

  • Install a new push button pedestrian crossing on Battersea Bridge Road, close to Hester Road to link with the Thames Path, where we plan to install a bus gate which will also improve bus journey times for buses travelling northwards
  • Introduce a new pedestrian and cyclist crossing at the Battersea Bridge Road/Battersea Church Road junction to improve both pedestrian and cyclist safety, as well as help manage previously confirmed aggressive driver behaviour when entering and exiting Battersea Church Road. We propose to remove a parking bay (2 cars) in Battersea Church Road to accommodate the new stop line for the signal controlled junction
  • Extend the bus lane from Banbury Street northwards on Battersea Bridge Road to improve bus journey times. We also propose to remove one 12m parking bay (2 car spaces) at this location to accommodate the new bus lane
  • Reconfigure the crossing points at the junction of Battersea Bridge Road with the Prince of Wales Drive, widening pavements, removing the existing traffic island, and building two new push button crossings. We also propose to reduce the parking bay by 5m (1 car) at Prince of Wales Drive to and remove a loading bay on Battersea Bridge Road to accommodate the new signalised crossing
  • Ban the right turn from Battersea Bridge Road into Parkgate Road, and the left turn into the B305 (and make kerb adjustments at Westbridge Road). This will improve safety for pedestrians and cyclists and improve journey times for buses

In addition to making Battersea Bridge a safer place for people walking and cycling, it is critical the schemes at both ends of the bridge work well together to keep traffic moving as efficiently as possible across the bridge, through junction and surrounding roads.

In December 2021, we introduced a 20mph speed limit on Chelsea Embankment and on Battersea Bridge. We also plan to introduce a 20mph speed limit along A3220 Battersea Bridge Road. Subject to resources, we aim for this to be introduced in March 2024. We will be in touch with residents and stakeholders closer to the time with more information.

Engagement exercise - scheme proposals at the northern end of the bridge

From 12 July to 23 August 2022, we ran a survey asking people to share their initial thoughts on how they felt our plans for the northern side of the bridge will impact on safety.

Over 300 people responded to the survey, and 27 people sent us their thoughts via email.

The survey asked people to tell us how they mostly cross this junction now, and how safe they feel when crossing on foot and when cycling. 341 people completed the survey.

Of those respondents:

  • 78.9% told us they feel very unsafe or fairly unsafe when crossing the junction on foot
  • 79.5% told us they feel very unsafe or fairly unsafe when crossing the junction by bike

We then asked people to tell us what they think we should prioritise when making changes to the junction.

Respondents ranked the needs of pedestrians as their top priority, followed by the needs of cyclists, and the needs of bus passengers.

The lowest priorities for local people (78.2% of respondents classified themselves as a local resident) were the needs of motorists.

The results of this part of the survey in full are as follows:

Ranked in order of importance:

  1. The needs of pedestrians
  2. The needs of cyclists
  3. The needs of bus passengers
  4. The needs of motorists making business trips
  5. The needs of motorists making personal trips

A full report of the engagement exercise is available in the 'Documents' section.

Have your say

We want to know your views and we are holding an eight week consultation on our proposals. You can reply by following the link to the online survey below.

You will need to register with our Have your say platform to take part in the online survey and your details will be kept secure. Alternatively, you can send your response to us by email at haveyoursay@tfl.gov.uk or by post to FREEPOST TFL HAVE YOUR SAY. The closing date for comments is 24 January 2023.

Information to help you respond

We want this consultation to be accessible to everyone. If you need to translate this page into another language, please use the ‘Select language’ button in the bottom-left hand corner of this page.

There is additional information in the ‘Documents’ section of this page:

Virtual Community Conversation

As part of our consultation, we are hosting one-on-one ‘Community Conversations’ with local people who have questions about the scheme. The sessions are intended only for those people who need to discuss a question with us so that they can then submit a response to the consultation. If you simply want to tell us about your views of the Battersea Bridge scheme, the best way to do that is to reply to the consultation. You can do that by completing our survey, sending us an email or writing to us at our Freepost address.

If you have a more general question, our FAQs may already have the answer, please check there first. For further details, or to register to take part, please see our Eventbrite booking page.

Consultation has concluded

Please let us know if you have any questions that will help you respond to the consultation. We will then get back to you. Note this tool is not for responding to the consultation, please do that via the survey. 

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Questions asked may be publicly available after the consultation has closed and we may also include them in the form of a report on the results of the consultation exercise, but any personal information will be kept confidential. Your personal information will be properly safeguarded and processed in accordance with the requirements of privacy and data protection legislation. For further information, please visit our privacy policy

  • is the safety of cyclists crossing Battersea Bridge being considered, as it is a very busy bridge with heavy traffic?

    ClappersSW4 asked 5 months ago

    As part of Phase 1 of the scheme in 2021, we added a cycle Advanced Stop Line on the northbound approach of the bridge, alongside reducing the speed limit to 20mph.  

    Our current proposals include to amend the existing crossing at the bridge to a Toucan crossing so cyclists can cross the north side of the bridge when using the shared use footway on the southern side of Cheyne Walk.

    Unfortunately the available road space on the bride limits how we can change the road layout and we do not have any further proposals at this stage.