Increasing the fine level for drivers who fail to follow the rules on TfL managed roads

Consultation has concluded

Between 5 August and 19 September 2021 we held a public consultation on a proposal to increase the fine level for drivers who fail to follow the rules on TfL managed roads. Our proposal would mean the fine level (TfL penalty charge) could increase from £130 to £160, reduced by half to £80 if paid within 14 days.

We received over 2,000 responses to the consultation. Thank you to those who took part. We are now considering the feedback we received and are preparing a consultation report to present to the Mayor of London. Please see the

Consultation has concluded

Between 5 August and 19 September 2021 we held a public consultation on a proposal to increase the fine level for drivers who fail to follow the rules on TfL managed roads. Our proposal would mean the fine level (TfL penalty charge) could increase from £130 to £160, reduced by half to £80 if paid within 14 days.

We received over 2,000 responses to the consultation. Thank you to those who took part. We are now considering the feedback we received and are preparing a consultation report to present to the Mayor of London. Please see the ‘What’s next?’ section below for more details.

Overview

To help keep London moving safely and reduce disruption and delays we are proposing to increase the fine level (TfL penalty charge) from £130 to £160 for people who fail to follow the rules of the red route network (those roads we manage in London). The fine level would be reduced by half to £80 if paid within 14 days.

We want this consultation to be accessible to everyone. There is an Easy Read version of our materials in the ‘Documents’ section. There is also an Easy Read version of our survey.

In the bottom right-hand corner, there are also British Sign Language videos of the proposals and survey (audio versions of these are available in the ‘Documents’ section).

If you need to translate this page into another language, please use the ‘Select language’ button in the bottom-left hand corner of this page.

Our proposal in more detail

We are responsible for the Transport for London Road Network (TLRN) also known as 'red routes'. Red routes can be identified by the red no-stopping signs and lines along the road.

The TLRN makes up 5% of London’s roads and carries up to 30% of the city's traffic. London’s local authorities manage the rest of our city’s roads.

You can find maps showing all the red routes in London in the ‘Documents’ section.

Keeping traffic moving safely

Our priority in managing the red route network is to keep traffic moving safely. When people don’t follow red route signs and road markings, it creates safety risks, disrupts traffic, and creates congestion for everyone. Vital deliveries and collections can be obstructed, and buses and the emergency services can be delayed.

To minimise this we use enforcement tools, like fines, to encourage everyone to follow the rules of the road.

Income we receive from fines is used to cover the cost of enforcement, and any surplus is reinvested in making roads safer.

Fines, which are called Penalty Charge Notices (PCNs), can be issued on red routes for, but are not limited to:

  • Vehicles parking illegally in loading bays
  • Vehicles blocking yellow box junctions or making a turn where this movement is banned
  • Vehicles driving or parking in a bus lane
  • Vehicles parking illegally on double red lines, or on single red lines at times when parking is not permitted
  • Vehicles parking in red route parking bays longer than permitted

Increasing the cost of the PCN

The cost of a PCN for contraventions on the red route network has not increased for over 10 years. In April 2011 it rose from £120 to £130. It currently stands at £130.

Our proposed PCN increase to £160, for contraventions on the red route network, is in line with inflation since the last PCN increase in 2011.

According to the Bank of England inflation calculator, inflation has averaged at 2.5% a year since 2011.

An effective deterrent

We believe it is important that the level of a PCN, for contraventions on the red route network, must remain an effective deterrent. A higher PCN level is anticipated to be a more effective deterrent that will, over time, lead to a reduced level of contraventions.

Good levels of compliance would improve safety for all road users, reduce congestion and reduce journey times as more obstructions to free-flowing traffic would be reduced.

This would help deliver benefits such as road safety, bus reliability, reduced congestion, improved air quality and the encouragement of active travel as walking and cycling becomes more enjoyable in a pleasant environment. This is in line with the long-term objectives within the Mayor’s Transport Strategy.

For further reading, including details of our previous public consultation related to PCNs held in 2017, please see the Background page in ‘Documents’.

Equalities Impact Assessment

We have undertaken an Equality Impact Assessment (EqIA). The EqIA examines what impact (positive or negative) the proposed PCN increase for contraventions on the red route may have on customers with characteristics protected by the Equality Act 2010.

The EqIA can be found in the ‘Documents’ section.

What’s next?

This proposal is subject to the outcome of our consultation. Once consultation ends on 19 September 2021, we will spend time considering all the responses we receive and will prepare a consultation report.

The consultation report will be presented to the Mayor of London, who will then decide whether to increase the level of the PCN for contraventions of the rules of the red route network.

Should the Mayor decide to increase the level of the PCN, he must notify the Secretary of State for Transport.

The Secretary of State may object if it is considered the level of the financial penalty would be excessive. If he does so, the increased level may not be introduced until the Secretary of State withdraws the objection.

The Secretary of State must exercise his reserve powers within 28 days of being notified.

Once the above process ends, should it be decided that the cost of the penalty charge will increase, we will communicate this.

A copy of the consultation report will be available to everyone that takes part in the consultation and a copy will be published on our website.

Have your say

We are running a public consultation about this proposal. The consultation is open from Thursday 5 August 2021 to Sunday 19 September 2021.

Please share your views by taking part in our online survey. It should take you no more than 10 minutes to complete.

To take part you will need to register with your email address. Your details will be kept secure and only used, with your permission, to update you about the outcome of the consultation and our next steps.

If you prefer not to complete the survey, then please submit your response to us in writing (no stamp needed) to:

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Please let us know if you have any questions that will help you respond to the consultation. We will then get back to you. Note this tool is not for responding to the consultation, please do that via the survey. 

Please note that any questions you ask may be visible to others and will be subject to moderation. Any personal information will be kept confidential but your user name will be displayed. Further details on moderation are available here

Questions asked may be publicly available after the project has closed and we may also include them in the form of a report on the results of the engagement exercise, but any personal information will be kept confidential. Your personal information will be properly safeguarded and processed in accordance with the requirements of privacy and data protection legislation. For further information, please visit our privacy policy

  • This survey is a waste of time, as not relevant issues covered,for example reduction of road space is partially responsible for non compliance. In other words tfl initially creates the problem, then issues fines for non compliance.

    hyde17 asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for your recent comment about our consultation proposing to increase the fine level for drivers who fail to follow the rules on TfL managed roads. The question tool is designed to let us know if you have any questions that will help you respond to the consultation. 

    We are polling respondents on whether increasing the cost of the penalty charge is considered to be an effective deterrent. We are then seeking thoughts on the proposal to help us understand the reasons why respondents may support or oppose it, such as whether it may cause them any particular difficulties or hardship, or unfairly penalise any particular group of road users. 

    Question two in our survey provides a comment box where we would like respondents to record thoughts. If you have not done so already, please consider completing our survey to share your thoughts with us. The closing date for comments is Sunday 19 September 2021. Alternatively, comments can also be sent by email to haveyoursay@tfl.gov.uk

    If you have a specific query or comment to make about a particular location on the Transport for London road network you can contact our customer services team via our website here: https://tfl.gov.uk/help-and-contact/


  • Will Blue Badge holders be exempt from the new penalty charges?

    Melgamp asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for your question. 

    Blue Badge holders are not exempt from penalty charges, however a notice is only issued when the rules of the road are not followed.

    Blue Badge holders have more flexibility when using red routes and can often park where others can't. 

    Red route signs and lines will tell Blue Badge holders exactly where and when they can park on the Transport for London road network. Blue Badge holders should always check road signs and ensure badges are on display when parking in the following facilities

    Loading boxes: Generally for up to three hours

    Parking boxes: Generally for as long as the holder requires

    Red lines: Vehicles can stop on red lines to pick up and drop off blue badge holders but will need to move on quickly

  • What are you doing to improve enforcement?

    Lourob asked about 1 month ago

    Thank you for your question. 

    The enforcement of parking and moving traffic contraventions in bus lanes on the Transport for London Road Network (TLRN) remains a priority for our Road Network Compliance Team. We are not responsible for the enforcement of contraventions on roads managed by London's local authorities - this is the responsibility of the relevant London borough. 

    We are enhancing our enforcement activity with the introduction of new enforcement cameras that can be moved around the road network to where they are most needed. A trial of the new cameras in 2020 saw improvements in compliance by up to 60 per cent over six months. 

    Furthermore, most bus lanes on the TLRN now operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week. This is to support a sustainable recovery from the pandemic by helping to make bus journeys more reliable and consistent. Bus lane signs have changed to indicate the new hours of operation.

  • Please describe ONE TfL traffic improvement scheme you have implemented in the past 5 years that has benefitted motorists in terms of reducing congestion and improving traffic flow?

    Standstill asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for your question.

    In line with long-term objectives within the Mayor of London’s Transport Strategy our focus is on measures to promote mode shift to walking, cycling and public transport to improve Londoners’ health and air quality, and to reduce carbon emissions.

    We have a clear approach to addressing congestion. We are focusing on a short-term effort to ensure the streets are operating as efficiently as possible and we have a longer-term plan to achieve a shift away from car use towards more efficient means of travel,  with a Healthy Streets approach to the way streets are laid out to encourage more Londoners to walk, cycle and use public transport.  This approach aims to improve air quality, reduce congestion and help make London's diverse communities greener, healthier and more attractive places to live, work, play and do business. 

    Enforcement of contraventions on the red route network plays a key role towards healthy streets. Good levels of compliance reduce obstructions to free-flowing traffic which helps improve safety for all road users, reduces congestion and reduces journey times.

    One such example of a transport scheme we have implemented in recent years is at Redbridge Roundabout. As a result of a road safety scheme arising from a collision study changes were made to road lane markings and kerb lines that improves the flow of traffic around the roundabout. We also widened the road on the south-eastern edge of the roundabout to provide more space for larger vehicles, making it easier for them to navigate and exit the junction. 

    Other schemes underway play an important role in maintaining some of London’s key structures such as the Gunnersbury Avenue bridge replacement work, large investment to maintain Westway, and looking ahead, our plans for the Silvertown tunnel, linking to east London to the Greenwich peninsula. A key element of this project will be to reduce congestion at the Blackwall Tunnel.

    Each year we also review the timings of over 1,000 sets of traffic signals in London, using current sources of traffic data to refine existing traffic signal timings.  As traffic patterns change on the road network, undertaking detailed timing reviews of our signals benefits pedestrians, bus passengers and other road users.  Road junctions are a key constraining factor on the effective operation of the road network, so maximising their performance is an important part of good network management. Undertaking focused timing reviews with the intention of ensuring the road network operates safely and reliably supports public transport, key worker journeys, emergency vehicle routes and key freight links for essential goods to be delivered, in support the Healthy Streets approach.

    You can find out more about current and planned improvement work and projects on our website here: https://tfl.gov.uk/travel-information/improvements-and-projects/


  • Where in this is there anything that could be considered part of a 'strategy' by the mayor? Is it not just another way of increasing revenues?

    cdsmedley asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for your question.

    The proposed higher Penalty Charge Notice level is anticipated to lead to a reduction in the level of offences, over time, making London’s busiest roads safer and more reliable for everyone using them.  

    In line with the long-term objectives within the Mayor’s Transport Strategy, this change would help deliver benefits for road safety and bus reliability. Better compliance with the rules of the road would help reduce congestion and improve air quality. We also want to encourage more active travel such as walking and cycling, by making the red route a more enjoyable and pleasant environment.  

    You can read more about the Mayor's Transport Strategy on our website here: https://tfl.gov.uk/corporate/about-tfl/the-mayors-transport-strategy.

  • What makes you believe that an increase of the fine from very high to excessive will create an additional deterrent?

    skip2myluh asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for your question.

    The level of fine for contraventions on the red route network has not increased for over ten years. The last increase was in April 2011 when it rose from £120 to £130.  The fine is halved if paid within 14 days. 

    The proposed increase to £160 is in line with inflation since the last increase. Inflation on goods and services in the UK averaged at an increase of 2.6% a year between 2011 and 2019, meaning £130 of good and services in 2011 would cost £162.03 in 2020. In real terms, this means that this penalty has decreased in value and deterrence from £130 to around £105.90 (in 2011 prices). 

    We expect the higher fine level to be a more effective deterrent that will, over time, lead to a reduced level of contraventions and help to keep the road network safe for everyone. Increased compliance with the rules is also expected to boost bus reliability, reduce congestion, improve air quality and the encourage more people to walk and cycle.  Our priority is to keep London moving safely and reduce delays, not raising revenue through fines. We want to help people understand and follow the red routes rules so they can avoid an unnecessary fine. Signs and road markings along the red routes tell people what they can and can't do. We only issue Penalty Charge Notices (PCN) when it is warranted to those who don't follow the rules indicated by signs and road markings and their actions could have resulted in delay, disruption or the risk of a collision.  

    Revenue from PCNs is used to cover the cost of enforcement and any surplus revenue is reinvested to help fund road safety schemes. 


  • When will TFL properly enforce violations of red routes/bus lanes. Used to be very well policed. Not anymore

    Electricman1 asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for your question. 

    The enforcement of parking and moving traffic contraventions in bus lanes on the Transport for London Road Network (TLRN) remains a priority for our Road Network Compliance Team. We are not responsible for the enforcement of contraventions on roads managed by London's local authorities - this is the responsibility of the relevant London borough. 

    We are enhancing our enforcement activity with the introduction of new enforcement cameras that can be moved around the road network to where they are most needed. A trial of the new cameras in 2020 saw improvements in compliance by up to 60 per cent over six months. 

    Furthermore, most bus lanes on the TLRN now operate 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. This is to support a sustainable recovery from the pandemic by helping to make bus journeys more reliable and consistent. Bus lane signs have changed to indicate the new hours of operation.If there are any specific bus lane locations on the TLRN that you are concerned about because of non-compliance and we can look into this further. 

  • What percentage of these fines actually goes back into the upkeep of the roads

    Unhappy Driver asked 2 months ago

     

    Thank you for your question.
    All income from Transport for London Penalty Charge Notices is re-invested by us to cover the cost of enforcement and help fund schemes to reduce road danger.