Improving the junction at Sussex Gardens and Edgware Road for pedestrians and cyclists

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Consultation has concluded

Update 13 May 2024

Between 6 November and 18 December 2023, we consulted on proposals to improve the junction at Sussex Gardens and Edgware Road for pedestrians and cyclists.

We have now published our consultation report, to explain the outcomes of the consultation.

The consultation report is now available to read.

Next Steps

We have considered all the feedback we have received and have decided to proceed with our proposals as set out in the consultation.

We hope to complete construction of the project during 2025 and will keep local people updated with our plans to build the new crossing.

-update ends-


Update 19 December 2023

This consultation has now closed. Thank you to everyone who responded. We are analysing your feedback and will report back shortly.

-update ends-

We would like to hear your views about proposals to make the junction at Sussex Gardens and Edgware Road safer and more pleasant for pedestrians and cyclists.

On this page you can read what is proposed and how you can have your say.

You have until Monday 18 December 2023 to give us your feedback.


What are the proposals?

Summary of changes

Background

Information to help you respond

Equalities Impact Assessment

Tell us your views

What happens next



What are the proposals?


(Video giving an overview of the proposed changes)

The proposals are:

A simpler junction with direct and safer crossings:

  • Pedestrians will have straight across and wider crossing spaces replacing the two stage crossing. There will be a dedicated time for pedestrians to cross on a green walk signal at the same time, whilst all traffic is stopped at the traffic lights

  • Pedestrian countdowns at the traffic lights to improve safety and accessibility

  • Safer positioning on the road, safer turns and head starts for cyclists to make it easier for them to navigate the junction

  • Reallocating road space to pedestrian footways on the Edgware Road where traffic turns left into Sussex Gardens. This would give pedestrians more space and would feature a new rain garden. Traffic turning left would do so at the junction of Edgware Road and Sussex Gardens

  • Reallocating road space to pedestrian footways where traffic turns left from Old Marylebone Road (A501) into Edgware Road. This would give pedestrians more space and would feature large planters like those in Burwood Place. Traffic turning left would do so at the junction of Old Marylebone Road (A501) into Edgware Road

  • Planting four new ‘rain gardens’ along Edgware Road between Sussex Gardens and Kendall Road to make the area greener and more attractive

You can view the map and find more details about our proposals in the summary of changes.



Background

We want to make the junction at Sussex Gardens and Edgware Road safer, easier to cross and a more comfortable place for vulnerable road users, including pedestrians and cyclists, to travel through.

Safety is a priority for TfL and there have been 17 collisions at this junction in the three years up to 2019: seven people were seriously injured and tragically one person was killed in these collisions.

Our proposals are in line with our Vision Zero strategy, which aims to eradicate deaths and serious injuries from our roads. The proposals have been designed according to our Healthy Streets approach, which aims to make London a safer, healthier and greener place to live and travel.



Information to help you respond

We have provided more information to help you respond. Visit the Documents section for:

You can use the questions tool on this page during the consultation period. We will respond your questions as soon as we can.

If you need to translate this page into another language, please use the ‘Select language’ button at the bottom of this page.



Drop-in events

We are holding in-person events where you can hear more about our proposals at Waitrose, 168-176 Edgware Road, London W2 2DX:

  • Saturday 25 November 2023 (10:00 - 14:00)
  • Wednesday 6 December 2023 (15:00 - 19:00)

Please come along and let us know your views. If you are unable to attend and would like to discuss the proposals further with us, please get in touch and we can respond to your queries directly.



Equalities Impact Assessment

Our Equality Impact Assessment (EqIA) identifies:

  • The affects these proposals could have on people
  • How we propose to minimise any negative impacts

After we’ve considered all comments, the EqIA will be reviewed and may be updated.

We use the EqIA to help us decide if, and how, we should proceed with these proposals.



Connecting with London's deaf community on our consultations

A British Sign Language video of the proposals and survey is available.

To enhance how we engage and consult with London's deaf community we are trialling a British Sign Language (BSL) consultation conversation service for this consultation. This service will allow the TfL consultation lead to have a two-way BSL translated discussion on any aspect of this consultation with a BSL speaker.

To request a BSL consultation conversation please contact us at haveyoursay@tfl.gov.uk and we will be in contact to arrange this at a convenient time. Following this trial, we will evaluate the service to determine if this is something we are able to offer on other consultations in the future.



What happens next

These proposals are subject to the outcome of our consultation. Once consultation ends on Monday 18 December 2023, we will spend time considering all the responses we receive and will prepare a consultation report.

The report will be available to everyone that takes part in the consultation and a copy will be published on our website.

Update 13 May 2024

Between 6 November and 18 December 2023, we consulted on proposals to improve the junction at Sussex Gardens and Edgware Road for pedestrians and cyclists.

We have now published our consultation report, to explain the outcomes of the consultation.

The consultation report is now available to read.

Next Steps

We have considered all the feedback we have received and have decided to proceed with our proposals as set out in the consultation.

We hope to complete construction of the project during 2025 and will keep local people updated with our plans to build the new crossing.

-update ends-


Update 19 December 2023

This consultation has now closed. Thank you to everyone who responded. We are analysing your feedback and will report back shortly.

-update ends-

We would like to hear your views about proposals to make the junction at Sussex Gardens and Edgware Road safer and more pleasant for pedestrians and cyclists.

On this page you can read what is proposed and how you can have your say.

You have until Monday 18 December 2023 to give us your feedback.


What are the proposals?

Summary of changes

Background

Information to help you respond

Equalities Impact Assessment

Tell us your views

What happens next



What are the proposals?


(Video giving an overview of the proposed changes)

The proposals are:

A simpler junction with direct and safer crossings:

  • Pedestrians will have straight across and wider crossing spaces replacing the two stage crossing. There will be a dedicated time for pedestrians to cross on a green walk signal at the same time, whilst all traffic is stopped at the traffic lights

  • Pedestrian countdowns at the traffic lights to improve safety and accessibility

  • Safer positioning on the road, safer turns and head starts for cyclists to make it easier for them to navigate the junction

  • Reallocating road space to pedestrian footways on the Edgware Road where traffic turns left into Sussex Gardens. This would give pedestrians more space and would feature a new rain garden. Traffic turning left would do so at the junction of Edgware Road and Sussex Gardens

  • Reallocating road space to pedestrian footways where traffic turns left from Old Marylebone Road (A501) into Edgware Road. This would give pedestrians more space and would feature large planters like those in Burwood Place. Traffic turning left would do so at the junction of Old Marylebone Road (A501) into Edgware Road

  • Planting four new ‘rain gardens’ along Edgware Road between Sussex Gardens and Kendall Road to make the area greener and more attractive

You can view the map and find more details about our proposals in the summary of changes.



Background

We want to make the junction at Sussex Gardens and Edgware Road safer, easier to cross and a more comfortable place for vulnerable road users, including pedestrians and cyclists, to travel through.

Safety is a priority for TfL and there have been 17 collisions at this junction in the three years up to 2019: seven people were seriously injured and tragically one person was killed in these collisions.

Our proposals are in line with our Vision Zero strategy, which aims to eradicate deaths and serious injuries from our roads. The proposals have been designed according to our Healthy Streets approach, which aims to make London a safer, healthier and greener place to live and travel.



Information to help you respond

We have provided more information to help you respond. Visit the Documents section for:

You can use the questions tool on this page during the consultation period. We will respond your questions as soon as we can.

If you need to translate this page into another language, please use the ‘Select language’ button at the bottom of this page.



Drop-in events

We are holding in-person events where you can hear more about our proposals at Waitrose, 168-176 Edgware Road, London W2 2DX:

  • Saturday 25 November 2023 (10:00 - 14:00)
  • Wednesday 6 December 2023 (15:00 - 19:00)

Please come along and let us know your views. If you are unable to attend and would like to discuss the proposals further with us, please get in touch and we can respond to your queries directly.



Equalities Impact Assessment

Our Equality Impact Assessment (EqIA) identifies:

  • The affects these proposals could have on people
  • How we propose to minimise any negative impacts

After we’ve considered all comments, the EqIA will be reviewed and may be updated.

We use the EqIA to help us decide if, and how, we should proceed with these proposals.



Connecting with London's deaf community on our consultations

A British Sign Language video of the proposals and survey is available.

To enhance how we engage and consult with London's deaf community we are trialling a British Sign Language (BSL) consultation conversation service for this consultation. This service will allow the TfL consultation lead to have a two-way BSL translated discussion on any aspect of this consultation with a BSL speaker.

To request a BSL consultation conversation please contact us at haveyoursay@tfl.gov.uk and we will be in contact to arrange this at a convenient time. Following this trial, we will evaluate the service to determine if this is something we are able to offer on other consultations in the future.



What happens next

These proposals are subject to the outcome of our consultation. Once consultation ends on Monday 18 December 2023, we will spend time considering all the responses we receive and will prepare a consultation report.

The report will be available to everyone that takes part in the consultation and a copy will be published on our website.

Consultation has concluded

If you have any questions about the scheme, you can ask us here and we will get back to you.

Please note that any questions you ask may be visible to others and will be subject to moderation. Any personal information will be kept confidential but your user name will be displayed. Further details on moderation are available here and privacy here.

  • Share RE raingardens: Will the horticultural team look into alternatives to London Plain trees as these cause significant allergy pollutants at certain times of the year causing havoc to those with breathing difficulties? Now that we have an opportunity to plan for the future- can alternative species be considered please such as the Maple trees that line the high traffic area near Warwick Avenue station? on Facebook Share RE raingardens: Will the horticultural team look into alternatives to London Plain trees as these cause significant allergy pollutants at certain times of the year causing havoc to those with breathing difficulties? Now that we have an opportunity to plan for the future- can alternative species be considered please such as the Maple trees that line the high traffic area near Warwick Avenue station? on Twitter Share RE raingardens: Will the horticultural team look into alternatives to London Plain trees as these cause significant allergy pollutants at certain times of the year causing havoc to those with breathing difficulties? Now that we have an opportunity to plan for the future- can alternative species be considered please such as the Maple trees that line the high traffic area near Warwick Avenue station? on Linkedin Email RE raingardens: Will the horticultural team look into alternatives to London Plain trees as these cause significant allergy pollutants at certain times of the year causing havoc to those with breathing difficulties? Now that we have an opportunity to plan for the future- can alternative species be considered please such as the Maple trees that line the high traffic area near Warwick Avenue station? link

    RE raingardens: Will the horticultural team look into alternatives to London Plain trees as these cause significant allergy pollutants at certain times of the year causing havoc to those with breathing difficulties? Now that we have an opportunity to plan for the future- can alternative species be considered please such as the Maple trees that line the high traffic area near Warwick Avenue station?

    KimCW asked 6 months ago

    Thanks for your enquiry Kim.

    I have added your question to the consultation. No decision has been made regarding which plants will be included in the rain gardens yet and your comments will be considered by the team as they develop their ideas.

    kind regards

    Simon

  • Share Thank you for the detailed explanation of how a cyclist will turn right. I don't think that will fit on a sign that I can read while I am cycling with the lorries and I try and take the lane. How about having a separate phase for all cyclists, like you will do with pedestrians? Like pedestrians, cyclists go at a human speed that can negotiate with other cyclists. You then just need a simple sign "All Cycle Phase" rather than have cyclists who have missed the road paint while they are looking at heavy lorries and fast large cars at that junction. on Facebook Share Thank you for the detailed explanation of how a cyclist will turn right. I don't think that will fit on a sign that I can read while I am cycling with the lorries and I try and take the lane. How about having a separate phase for all cyclists, like you will do with pedestrians? Like pedestrians, cyclists go at a human speed that can negotiate with other cyclists. You then just need a simple sign "All Cycle Phase" rather than have cyclists who have missed the road paint while they are looking at heavy lorries and fast large cars at that junction. on Twitter Share Thank you for the detailed explanation of how a cyclist will turn right. I don't think that will fit on a sign that I can read while I am cycling with the lorries and I try and take the lane. How about having a separate phase for all cyclists, like you will do with pedestrians? Like pedestrians, cyclists go at a human speed that can negotiate with other cyclists. You then just need a simple sign "All Cycle Phase" rather than have cyclists who have missed the road paint while they are looking at heavy lorries and fast large cars at that junction. on Linkedin Email Thank you for the detailed explanation of how a cyclist will turn right. I don't think that will fit on a sign that I can read while I am cycling with the lorries and I try and take the lane. How about having a separate phase for all cyclists, like you will do with pedestrians? Like pedestrians, cyclists go at a human speed that can negotiate with other cyclists. You then just need a simple sign "All Cycle Phase" rather than have cyclists who have missed the road paint while they are looking at heavy lorries and fast large cars at that junction. link

    Thank you for the detailed explanation of how a cyclist will turn right. I don't think that will fit on a sign that I can read while I am cycling with the lorries and I try and take the lane. How about having a separate phase for all cyclists, like you will do with pedestrians? Like pedestrians, cyclists go at a human speed that can negotiate with other cyclists. You then just need a simple sign "All Cycle Phase" rather than have cyclists who have missed the road paint while they are looking at heavy lorries and fast large cars at that junction.

    Londoner1565 asked 6 months ago

    Thanks for your response. I've added it to the consultation responses.

    kind regards

    Simon

  • Share I'm confused by the cycle right turn arrows. If I cycle, how would I position myself in the cycle survival zone (in front of big vehicles) to turn right? on Facebook Share I'm confused by the cycle right turn arrows. If I cycle, how would I position myself in the cycle survival zone (in front of big vehicles) to turn right? on Twitter Share I'm confused by the cycle right turn arrows. If I cycle, how would I position myself in the cycle survival zone (in front of big vehicles) to turn right? on Linkedin Email I'm confused by the cycle right turn arrows. If I cycle, how would I position myself in the cycle survival zone (in front of big vehicles) to turn right? link

    I'm confused by the cycle right turn arrows. If I cycle, how would I position myself in the cycle survival zone (in front of big vehicles) to turn right?

    Londoner1565 asked 6 months ago

    Cyclists wishing to turn right can do so by progressing to the cyclist reservoir area which is demarcated by a symbol which shows a bike and a right turn arrow. This symbol is placed out of the path of ahead traffic so cyclists can wait safely for ahead traffic to clear. From this position they will be able to see a signal on the far side of the junction which will tell them when it is safe to proceed. This feature is detailed in the London Cycling Design Standards in Chapter 5 https://content.tfl.gov.uk/lcds-chapter5-junctionsandcrossings.pdf on page 35 and is becoming more common across London’s network. A good example of a junction where this has been in place for a while is Mile End Rd junction with Sidney St. There will also be signs on the approach to the junction and a box sign on the signal head reinforcing the rules of the right turn.

    kind regards

  • Share You say:- "Safety is a priority for TfL and there have been 17 collisions at this junction in the three years up to 2019: seven people were seriously injured and tragically one person was killed in these collisions." What about the nearly 4 years since this date? What were the route cause of each of the 17 accidents you have chosen to highlight? on Facebook Share You say:- "Safety is a priority for TfL and there have been 17 collisions at this junction in the three years up to 2019: seven people were seriously injured and tragically one person was killed in these collisions." What about the nearly 4 years since this date? What were the route cause of each of the 17 accidents you have chosen to highlight? on Twitter Share You say:- "Safety is a priority for TfL and there have been 17 collisions at this junction in the three years up to 2019: seven people were seriously injured and tragically one person was killed in these collisions." What about the nearly 4 years since this date? What were the route cause of each of the 17 accidents you have chosen to highlight? on Linkedin Email You say:- "Safety is a priority for TfL and there have been 17 collisions at this junction in the three years up to 2019: seven people were seriously injured and tragically one person was killed in these collisions." What about the nearly 4 years since this date? What were the route cause of each of the 17 accidents you have chosen to highlight? link

    You say:- "Safety is a priority for TfL and there have been 17 collisions at this junction in the three years up to 2019: seven people were seriously injured and tragically one person was killed in these collisions." What about the nearly 4 years since this date? What were the route cause of each of the 17 accidents you have chosen to highlight?

    Errrrrr asked 7 months ago

    Before Covid-19, we conducted a road safety study using the most current data available at that time. Over the 36 months leading up to December 2019, the data indicated a concerning trend of pedestrian, cyclist, and motorbike collisions at specific points within the junction. Notably, serious pedestrian incidents occurred at the left turn slip from Old Marylebone Rd and the pedestrian crossing of Sussex Gardens. Additionally, the data highlighted incidents involving cyclists and motorbikes, which led to serious injuries:

    Data source: 36 months to December 2019:

    • Total number of collisions: 17
    • Total serious casualties: 6 
    • 5 cyclist casualties (2 serious) 
    • 8 pedestrian casualties (2 serious)
    • 3 Powered Two Wheelers (P2W) casualties (2 serious)
    • 2 Other vehicles casualties
    • Additionally, there was one pedestrian fatality between Burwood Place and Sussex Gardens.


    Then in March 2020, due to COVID-19, many of our schemes, including the A5 Sussex Gardens, were put on hold because of uncertainty surrounding funding. When the scheme restarted, the impact of the pandemic complicated our collision data, and the latest data available no longer accurately represented typical travel patterns for the following years.  The most recent pre-pandemic data only extends until March 2020, offering minimal additional insights in comparison to the above.

    As a result, to ensure that our interventions and decisions are founded on the most accurate information, we have continued to rely on pre-pandemic data. However, ongoing discussions are in progress regarding post-COVID data and how we address the effects of the pandemic, including the impact of lockdowns and other related factors.

  • Share What does this mean: Our proposals include new cycle signals to help cyclists move through the junction. Cyclists turning right both into and out of Edgware Road, would do so in two ‘stages’ under the protection of cycle only signals. on Facebook Share What does this mean: Our proposals include new cycle signals to help cyclists move through the junction. Cyclists turning right both into and out of Edgware Road, would do so in two ‘stages’ under the protection of cycle only signals. on Twitter Share What does this mean: Our proposals include new cycle signals to help cyclists move through the junction. Cyclists turning right both into and out of Edgware Road, would do so in two ‘stages’ under the protection of cycle only signals. on Linkedin Email What does this mean: Our proposals include new cycle signals to help cyclists move through the junction. Cyclists turning right both into and out of Edgware Road, would do so in two ‘stages’ under the protection of cycle only signals. link

    What does this mean: Our proposals include new cycle signals to help cyclists move through the junction. Cyclists turning right both into and out of Edgware Road, would do so in two ‘stages’ under the protection of cycle only signals.

    VincentStops asked 7 months ago

    On the traffic signal poles there will be small lights at eye level for cyclists. These signals will go green 4s before traffic starts. This helps cyclists to get moving in a stable manner ahead of traffic and be more visible to those cars wishing to turn left.

    The right turns at the junction are banned both in the current layout and in the proposal. They cannot be made by turning right across the approach lanes in the normal manner. They can only be made by cyclists in two stages by proceeding to the right turn pockets and waiting for the green signal of the following traffic stage. In the proposal the right turn pockets will be clearly signed both by road markings and signs on the approach. The option to perform a two stage right turn will be made safer by the cyclist early start signals. The cyclist early start signals will also be visible on the far-sided signals which can be seen from the right turn pockets.